pal00010.jpg | PALEOLITHIC  | Venus of Willendorf. | c. 25000 BCE | European | Paleolithic: Aurignacian | Limestone | Austria. | | ©Kathleen Cohen |

Magick Wicca Witch Witchcraft: Venus of Willendorf, circa 25000 BCE European Paleolithic: Aurignacian Limestone, Austria.

EARLY NEOLITHIC - Seated Mother Goddess, c. 6500. Çatal Höyük, Turkey.

witchywonderworks: “ Catal Huyuk, Seated Mother Goddess Catal Huyuk (Catal Hoyuk, Catalhuyuk) was an ancient Neolithic agricultural city in the Anatolia region of Turkey. It is the oldest settlement ever uncovered, dating from She had.

Seated goddess with a child, Hittite Empire, Old Hittite; 15th–13th century BC, Anatolia, central region, gold

Seated goddess with a child, Hittite Empire, Old Hittite / century BCE / Anatolia, central region / gold

ca. 4500–4000 BCE. Cycladic Marble Female Figure, a rare type known as"Steatopygous." now missing its head. The crossed arms and relatively thin upper body and stylized simple forms are familiar from the more common cycladic figures made much LATER. But a rounded figure with large hanging breasts, fleshy upper arms and roll on her abdomen, massive buttocks and thighs that taper to tiny stump feet is a rare type indicative of nourishment and fertility. MET

Steatopygous female figure, ca. Final Neolithic Cycladic Marble H.

Turkey / Artemis at Ephesus...the great mother archetype 3000 BCE

The concept of the Artemis of Ephesus type is not uncommon in antiquity. This one is a lovely Roman sculpture from Lepcis Magna, Libya. Now on display at the Archaeological Museum of Tripoli.

Terracotta statue of a throned divinity, probably Demeter (Goddess of harvests and earth fertility). Late 6th, early 5th century BCE, from Sicily. (Archaeological Museum, Milan)

Demeter

Terracotta statue of a throned divinity, probably Demeter (Goddess of harvests and earth fertility). Late early century BCE, from Sicily. (Archaeological Museum, Milan) by geneva

Venus Of Kostenki  | 23000 - 21000 BCE

mini-girlz: “ Kostenki Venus 23 000 - 21 000 BC Limestone H cm This figurine represents the Palaeolithic ‘Venus’, with overlarge breasts and belly. The faceless head bends towards the chest while the arms are pressed to the body with hands on.

NEOLITHIC ANATOLIAN Mother Goddess on feline throne (possibly a birthing chair?). Figurine from Level II, Catal Huyuk. (c. 5700 BCE) Turkey.

Mother Goddess on feline throne (possibly a birthing chair), ca. The Neolithic Anatolian Figurine from Level II, Catal Huyuk, Turkey.

"The worship of Cybele was originally centered in Phrygia (Turkey), where she was known Kubaba or Kybele. The Romans formally adopted her worship in 204 BCE, when they brought a statue representing her from her main shrine in the Phrygian city of Pergamum back to Rome. This statue, from a site in Anatolia dating to the eighth or early seventh century BCE, depicts the Phrygian goddess with two youthful attendants playing a flute and harp."

Phrygian statue of Kybele/Agdistis found on a post Hittite layer from the century BCE at or near Hattusa.

Baubo is a Greek Demi-Goddess. When Demeter was searching for Persephone, her daughter, she got really really pissed and made the world go into it's first winter. Which scared everyone. But Baubo, when she saw Demeter's sadness, lifted the Goddess's mood by lifting up her dress and flashing her. It made Demeter laugh out loud and winter began to turn to spring. Baubo reached demi-goddess status, and became one of Demeter's priestesses.

e-learning, conocimiento en red: Baubo & Open Educational Resources (I). The next big band or the last little whinper?

“In this painting by Nicolas Roerich, the veiled Sophia is surrounded by starlike disincarnate avatars of her wisdom, while below upon the earth, a pair of male and female mystics invoke her influence. This is a true representation of the World Soul and of transcendent appearance of Sophia Stellarum.”-Sophia: Goddess of Wisdom, Bride of God

by Nicolas Roerich, the veiled Sophia is surrounded by starlike disincarnate avatars of her wisdom, while below upon the earth, a pair of male and female mystics invoke her influence.

ninhursaga. sumerian goddess | joan relke

Ninhursaga's breasts are her symbol of life. She suckled all the kings, and has been said to be the mother of all Sumer's people. But she is no pushover or mere brood-cow. In many cultures, milk still represents the sacred, divine love of a Great Mother.

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