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1989: the Velvet Revolution in Prague, the capital of what was then Czechoslovakia.

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The crowds part only for attending ambulances as the Velvet Revolution is underway in Václavské náměstí (Wenceslas Square), Prague, Czechoslovakia, photographer unknown.

Václavské náměstí, 23. listopadu 1989. Největší shromáždění ,kde bylo na 300 tisíc demonstrantů. ("Velvet revolution", November 1989)

November 1989 in Prague when 300000 demonstrators protested the communist regime.

Velvet Revolution / Sametova revoluce 1989, Czechoslovakia

The Velvet Revolution (pictured) in 1989 ended 41 years of Communist oppression, but now they are set to once again have a say in the future of the Czech Republic

Vaclav Havel, then leader of the Prague opposition (right), and Alexander Dubcek, leader of the ill-fated Prague Spring, toast as they celebrate the resignation of the Czech Polit Bureau on November 24th, 1989.

Vaclav Havel, then leader of the Prague opposition (right), and Alexander Dubcek, leader of the ill-fated Prague Spring, toast as they celebrate the resignation of the Czech Polit Bureau on November

November 17, 1989: The Velvet Revolution begins in Czechoslovakia, after a student demonstration in Prague is halted by riot police. An uprising aimed at overthrowing the communist government begins.

Neal Ascherson on the fall of the eastern European regimes in 1989

November The Velvet Revolution begins in Czechoslovakia, after a student demonstration in Prague is halted by riot police. An uprising aimed at overthrowing the communist government begins.

Vaclav Havel is a personal hero. I think he would like my fried chicken and biscuits.

1993 - Vaclav Havel was elected president of the new Czech Republic.

Vaclav Havel reads out the names of Czechoslovakia’s first non-communist Government since 1948, Sunday, Dec. 10, 1989, Prague’s Wenceslas Square

Vaclav Havel reads out the names of Czechoslovakia’s first non-communist Government since Sunday, Dec. Prague’s Wenceslas Square

Former Czech President Vaclav Havel Former Czech president and hero of the Velvet Revolution Vaclav Havel, who steered his country to independence from Soviet rule in 1989, died on Sunday 18th December 2010, at the age of 75. R.I.P

Former Czech President Vaclav Havel Former Czech president and hero of the Velvet Revolution Vaclav Havel, who steered his country to independence from Soviet rule in died on Sunday December at the age of R.

Thousands of Czechs, using the 25th anniversary of the anti-communist Velvet Revolution, gather to call on the controversy-prone Czech President Milos Zeman to resign in Prague, Czech Republic, Monday, Nov. 17, 2014. The crowd gave Zeman a symbolic red card on Monday for demeaning the importance of human rights, a pro-Russian stance in the conflict in Ukraine, using vulgar language and recently downplaying the brutal use of force by police 25 years ago.

Thousands of Czechs, using the 25th anniversary of the anti-communist Velvet Revolution, gather to call on the controversy-prone Czech President Milos Zeman to resign in Prague, Czech Republic, Monday, Nov. 17, 2014. The crowd gave Zeman a symbolic red card on Monday for demeaning the importance of human rights, a pro-Russian stance in the conflict in Ukraine, using vulgar language and recently downplaying the brutal use of force by police 25 years ago.

Police detain protesters on January 15, 1989, 20 years after Palach's suicide. Demonstrations in his honor escalated into what would be known as "Palach Week," mass protests against Czechoslovakia's communist regime. The rallies were crucial in mobilizing support for the anticommunist protests of the Velvet Revolution later the same year.

The first demonstrations took place in January Protesters marking 20 years since Czech student Jan Palach self-immolated in protest against the Soviet-led invasion of 1968 were brutally dispersed by police.

Jaroslav Kučera - Václav Havel embraces Alexander Dubček at a meeting in the Laterna Magika theatre in Prague, at 24 November 1989, witnessed by journalist Jiří Černý. That same night the whole leadership of the Czechoslovak Communist Party resigns.

Jaroslav Kučera - Václav Havel embraces Alexander Dubček at a meeting in the Laterna Magika theatre in Prague, at 24 November witnessed by journalist Jiří Černý. That same night the whole leadership of the Czechoslovak Communist Party resigns.