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to have itchy feet  A person who has itchy feet is someone who finds it difficult to stay in one place and likes to travel and discover new places.

to have itchy feet A person who has itchy feet is someone who finds it difficult to stay in one place and likes to travel and discover new places.

BELOW THE BELT An action or remark described as below the belt is considered to be unfair or cruel.

BELOW THE BELT An action or remark described as below the belt is considered to be unfair or cruel.

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Idiom of this week: SNOWED UNDER Someone who is snowed under has so many things to do, usually work, that he is unable to cope with it all.

idiom of the week: THE GLOVES ARE OFF This expression is used when there are signs that a fight is about to start.

idiom of the week: THE GLOVES ARE OFF This expression is used when there are signs that a fight is about to start.

ace up your sleeve If you have an ace up your sleeve, you have something that will give you an advantage that other people don't know about.

ace up your sleeve If you have an ace up your sleeve, you have something that will give you an advantage that other people don't know about.

ON A SHOESTRING If you do something on a shoestring, you do it with very little money.

ON A SHOESTRING If you do something on a shoestring, you do it with very little money.

idiom of the week: BAD HAIR DAY Originating as a humorous comment about one's hair being unmanageable, this term has broadened to mean 'a day when everything seems to go wrong'.

idiom of the week: BAD HAIR DAY Originating as a humorous comment about one's hair being unmanageable, this term has broadened to mean 'a day when everything seems to go wrong'.

idiom of the week BUTTER SB. UP  When you butter somebody up, you flatter them or you are very nice to them, especially if you want to obtain something.

idiom of the week BUTTER SB. UP When you butter somebody up, you flatter them or you are very nice to them, especially if you want to obtain something.

FACE THE MUSIC When a person has to face the music, they have to accept the unpleasant consequences of their actions.

FACE THE MUSIC When a person has to face the music, they have to accept the unpleasant consequences of their actions.

idiom of the week: AS CLEAR AS A BELL = very clear, as with the sound of a bell

idiom of the week: AS CLEAR AS A BELL = very clear, as with the sound of a bell

FEEL BLUE To feel blue means to have feelings of deep sadness or depression.

FEEL BLUE To feel blue means to have feelings of deep sadness or depression.

Idiom of the week: play gooseberry  If you play gooseberry, you join or accompany two people who have a romantic relationship and want to be alone.

Idiom of the week: play gooseberry If you play gooseberry, you join or accompany two people who have a romantic relationship and want to be alone.

Idiom of this week: apple of your eye A person, usually a child, who is the apple of your eye is one for whom you have great affection.

Idiom of this week: apple of your eye A person, usually a child, who is the apple of your eye is one for whom you have great affection.

RAINDROP IN THE DROUGHT When someone is waiting for a raindrop in the drought, they are waiting and hoping for something that has little chance of happening.

RAINDROP IN THE DROUGHT When someone is waiting for a raindrop in the drought, they are waiting and hoping for something that has little chance of happening.

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