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Colliding galaxy clusters MACS J0717 3745, more than 5 billion light-years from Earth. Background is Hubble Space Telescope image; blue is X-ray image from Chandra, and red is VLA radio image.

Colliding galaxy clusters MACS more than 5 billion light-years from Earth. Background is Hubble Space Telescope image; blue is X-ray image from Chandra, and red is VLA radio image. - Credit: Van Weeren, et al.

Behold an expanding shell of debris called SNR 0519-69.0, left behind after a massive star exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud: “Multimillion degree gas is seen in X-rays from Chandra, in blue. The outer edge of the explosion (red) and stars in the field of view are seen in visible light from the Hubble Space Telescope.”(NASA/Chandra X-Ray Observatory)  Source: Humanoid History

In this image, an expanding shell of debris called SNR is left behind after a massive star exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to the Milky Way. Multimillion degree gas is seen in X-rays - NASA/CXC/SAO

~~NASA Find Clues that May Help Identify Dark Matter | Using observations from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have found that dark matter does not slow down when colliding with itself, meaning it interacts with itself less than previously thought. Researchers say this finding narrows down the options for what this mysterious substance might be | NASA Goddard Photo and Video~~

Everyone’s favourite physicist has a far-out live show about space (and aliens)

See the sky in a different light

See the sky in a different light

The Seagull Nebula: An infrared view of the Seagull Nebula, which sits 3600 light years from Earth.

Bright Spiral Galaxy M81 One of the brightest galaxies in planet Earth's sky is similar in size to our Milky Way Galaxy: big, beautiful M81. Image Credit: Subaru Telescope (NAOJ), Hubble Space Telescope; Processing & Copyright: Roberto Colombari & Robert Gendler

Bright Spiral Galaxy M81 One of the brightest galaxies in planet Earth's sky is similar in size to our Milky Way Galaxy: big, beautiful M81. Image Credit: Subaru Telescope (NAOJ), Hubble Space Telescope; Processing & Copyright: Roberto Colombari & Robert Gendler

Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar 2008 - The Big Picture

some galaxies were observed in this tiny patch of sky (a tenth the size of the full moon) and each galaxy a home to billions of stars. that's how unbelievably massive the visible universe is.

#NGC7714

NGC 7714 ~ This unusual structure is a river of Sun-like stars that has been pulled deep into space by the gravitational tug of a passing galaxy (not pictured) during a near-collision approximately 100 million years ago.

Friday, May 30, 2014: Stars form within nebula NGC 2170, which lie in the constellation of Monoceros (The Unicorn). A dark nebula, such as this one, provides raw material for the star formation going on inside them. The newly formed, massive blue stars seen here continue to push away traces of the dust that previously hid them from view. The material that remains will eventually disperse in the interstellar medium. ©2014 Tom Chao

Stars form within nebula NGC which lies in the constellation of Monoceros (The Unicorn). A dark nebula, such as this one, provides raw material for the star formation going on inside them.

Star-Forming Region NGC 3603 by Hubble Heritage, via Flickr    How is this even real?

clouds of interstellar gas and dust — the raw material for new star formation. The nebula, located light-years away in the constellation Carina, contains a central cluster of huge, hot stars, called NGC 3603

Hubble bubble: A delicate sphere of gas, imaged by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, floats in the depths of space

Pictures of the year 2010: space - Hubble, Chandra and Spitzer telescope images

Hubble bubble: A delicate sphere of gas (Hubble Space Telescope), floats in the depths of space

A spiral galaxy about 25 million light years from Earth. by Smithsonian Institution, via Flickr

Although Hubble can't point at the sun, it can still take some pretty awesome images, like this one, which shows a halo of hot gas surrounding spiral galaxy NGC 4631 that's similar to the Milky Way galaxy.

This remarkable picture from the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows one of the most perfect geometrical forms created in space. It captures the formation of an unusual pre-planetary nebula, known as IRAS 23166+1655, around the star LL Pegasi (also known as AFGL 3068) in the constellation of Pegasus (the Winged Horse).

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day 2016 December 11 The Extraordinary Spiral in LL Pegasi What created the strange spiral structure on the left? No one is sure, although it is likely related to a star in a binary star system entering the planetary.

Flaming Star Nebula

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey captured this view of a runaway star racing away from its original home. Surrounded by a glowing cloud of gas and dust, the star AE Aurigae appears on fire. Appropriately, the cloud is called the Flaming Star nebula.

Hubble Space Telescope

In honor of the twentieth anniversary of the launch of the Hubble telescope, view our gallery of star explosions, death-star galaxies, and stunning images taken over its two decades.

La NASA publica impresionantes imágenes de las galaxias del universo (11)

A spectacular NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image reveals the heart of the Lagoon Nebula. Seen as a massive cloud of glowing dust and gas, bombarded by the energetic radiation of new stars, this placid name hides a dramatic reality.

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