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Vertical Rhythms, Sir Terry Frost. Frost pictured not only vertical rhyme but also horizontal rhyme made form crescents. These rhymes together create a great example of a polyrhythmic structure.

Vertical Rhythms, Sir Terry Frost. Frost pictured not only vertical rhyme but also horizontal rhyme made form crescents. These rhymes together create a great example of a polyrhythmic structure.

Maurits Cornelis Escherwas, a Dutch graphic artist was most famous for his mathematically inspired structures and his exploration of representing infinity on a two-dimensional plane. Escher Web Sketch allows you to draw repeating patterns and to change the pattern symmetry and pattern size.

Maurits Cornelis Escherwas, a Dutch graphic artist was most famous for his mathematically inspired structures and his exploration of representing infinity on a two-dimensional plane. Escher Web Sketch allows you to draw repeating patterns and to change the pattern symmetry and pattern size.

René Magritte, l'état de Veille. The windows of the "missing" house form a regular rhyme, we can see the clear raster. Due to our experience, and this rhyme, it is easy for our eyes to imagine the missing object.

René Magritte, l'état de Veille. The windows of the "missing" house form a regular rhyme, we can see the clear raster. Due to our experience, and this rhyme, it is easy for our eyes to imagine the missing object.

Edward Hopper, Soir Bleu (Blue Night), 1914, We can see two focal points one of them is the clown, sitting in white clothes and the second is a woman standing behind the sitting people. Hopper underlined her importance by placing her into another position then others.

Edward Hopper, Soir Bleu (Blue Night), 1914, We can see two focal points one of them is the clown, sitting in white clothes and the second is a woman standing behind the sitting people. Hopper underlined her importance by placing her into another position then others.

Fall Of Icarus, Pieter Breughel. Probably all of us will first look at the red sleeve. Why? Because Breughel used the technique of enhancing the focal point by contrast. We can also see that the colors are very similar to those which used Vincent van Gogh. Deep red in combination with bright green highlight themselves.

Fall Of Icarus, Pieter Breughel. Probably all of us will first look at the red sleeve. Why? Because Breughel used the technique of enhancing the focal point by contrast. We can also see that the colors are very similar to those which used Vincent van Gogh. Deep red in combination with bright green highlight themselves.

The Night Café, Vincent van Gogh. Vincent van Gogh was a master in the use of contrast. In many his artworks we can see combination red-green or blue-yellow or orange. He used colored wool to test different combinations before trying them out with paints. As he describes: "…that there are colors that make each other shine, that make a couple, complete each other like man and wife." - Vincent van Gogh. The Night Café is perfectly balanced and eye catching.

The Night Café, Vincent van Gogh. Vincent van Gogh was a master in the use of contrast. In many his artworks we can see combination red-green or blue-yellow or orange. He used colored wool to test different combinations before trying them out with paints. As he describes: "…that there are colors that make each other shine, that make a couple, complete each other like man and wife." - Vincent van Gogh. The Night Café is perfectly balanced and eye catching.

Edward Hopper, Stairway, 1919. Edward Hopper is my favorite artist because he used to picture ordinary situations like streets or rooms. This picture makes a viewer think about what is around him, it evokes a feeling that it is viewer´s point of view and it continues somewhere.

Edward Hopper, Stairway, 1919. Edward Hopper is my favorite artist because he used to picture ordinary situations like streets or rooms. This picture makes a viewer think about what is around him, it evokes a feeling that it is viewer´s point of view and it continues somewhere.

The Summer by Claude Monet. Impressionists use the principle of proximity very often. When you stand too close to the artwork, you are unable to see the whole object. The idea of proximity is that small objects grouped together make the illusion of another, bigger object. This is how Monet pictured this beautiful scenery - objects are formed by short brushstrokes grouped together.

The Summer by Claude Monet. Impressionists use the principle of proximity very often. When you stand too close to the artwork, you are unable to see the whole object. The idea of proximity is that small objects grouped together make the illusion of another, bigger object. This is how Monet pictured this beautiful scenery - objects are formed by short brushstrokes grouped together.

Augustus Leopold Egg, Travelling Companion, 1862. Some might argue that this is not the perfect example of Symmetry. However, the girls sitting in the carriage are perfectly balanced, even the basket and the flowers balance themselves. This artwork is a proof that not symmetry does not mean only specular reflection.

Augustus Leopold Egg, Travelling Companion, 1862. Some might argue that this is not the perfect example of Symmetry. However, the girls sitting in the carriage are perfectly balanced, even the basket and the flowers balance themselves. This artwork is a proof that not symmetry does not mean only specular reflection.

Rising Moon, Hans Hofmann. Hoffman combines a lot of contrasts in this artwork. Not only color contrast, which is significant on the first sight but also contrast in shapes (square/round) and contrast in layers.The first layer seems to viewer´s eye like blurry and the second layer is very sharp.

Rising Moon, Hans Hofmann. Hoffman combines a lot of contrasts in this artwork. Not only color contrast, which is significant on the first sight but also contrast in shapes (square/round) and contrast in layers.The first layer seems to viewer´s eye like blurry and the second layer is very sharp.