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Before and after photos of Passchendaele WW1.

Before and after photos of Passchendaele

WW1: Algerian tirailleurs (infantry soldiers) serving with the French Army examine war booty at Chauconin-Neufmontiers, France, 1914. The original handwritten caption of the photo refers to them as "Turcos," a common term in those days referring to the Ottoman Turks, who still extended their authority over parts of the Middle East and were associated by Europeans with any Muslim combatant.

WW1: Algerian tirailleurs (infantry soldiers) serving with the French Army examine war booty at Chauconin-Neufmontiers, France, 1914. The original handwritten caption of the photo refers to them as "Turcos," a common term in those days referring to the Ottoman Turks, who still extended their authority over parts of the Middle East and were associated by Europeans with any Muslim combatant.

WW1: German soldiers, sitting in a well constructed trench, are picking lice from their clothes. This was a daily routine that brought no relief from the bests; they could destroyed only by BOILING the clothes for at least half hour.

Soldiers picking lice from their clothes in a trench. Trenches were filled with lice covered soldiers.The lice would embed themselves in the soldiers clothing and bite them.

27-year-old in 1916, Sir Charles Spencer "Charlie" Chaplin卓别林

A photographic portrait of Charlie Chaplin as a young man, Hollywood, taken around 1916 by an unknown photographer. Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin was an English comic actor and film producer and director of the silent film era.

Colour photos, not colourized, from WW I, 1917

liquidnight:Paul Castelnau “ A soldier sits and eats his lunch in front of a damaged bookstore. Place Royale, Reims, France Autochrome, Glass Negative, 1917 [From the Réunion des Musées Nationaux] ”

WW1: British troops lie dead in their trench following a German counterattack and artillery barrage. Note the ammo drums for the Lewis Light MG on the ground on both sides of the KIA in the center of the photo.

Otto von Bismarck was not a minister of Chancellor of Germany in the First World War (The Great War), was an old man and was forced to give up several years ago by the German Emperor Frederick II.