Marcela Konečná

Marcela Konečná

Marcela Konečná
Další nápady od uživatele Marcela
Dress in 2 pieces, Chauvet, ca. 1884–86. Yellow silk taffeta with black trim and lace. Photo: Jean Tholance. Les Arts Décoratifs via Europeana Fashion

Dress in 2 pieces, Chauvet, ca. 1884–86. Yellow silk taffeta with black trim and lace. Photo: Jean Tholance. Les Arts Décoratifs via Europeana Fashion

Like what you see? Follow me @BaddestPrincesses✨

Like what you see? Follow me @BaddestPrincesses✨

Evening dress Date: 1888–89 Culture: American Medium: silk Accession Number: C.I.47.65.1a, b

Evening dress Date: 1888–89 Culture: American Medium: silk Accession Number: C.I.47.65.1a, b

Chapter 2: The French were famous for their trompe l'oeil paintings and tricks. That was the only way to explain how this impossibly long hallway could fit in the hotel's building.

Chapter 2: The French were famous for their trompe l'oeil paintings and tricks. That was the only way to explain how this impossibly long hallway could fit in the hotel's building.

Order of Saint Andrew – Badge and Star (St. Petersburg, circa 1850. Enamels, gold, silver-gilt, pastes)

Order of Saint Andrew – Badge and Star (St. Petersburg, circa 1850. Enamels, gold, silver-gilt, pastes)

Queen Elizabeth I coronation collar.  “To be a King and wear a crown, is a thing more glorious to them that see it, than it is pleasant to them that bear it”

Queen Elizabeth I coronation collar. “To be a King and wear a crown, is a thing more glorious to them that see it, than it is pleasant to them that bear it”

Crown of William II  The Crown of William II, also known as the Hohenzollern Crown, is the 1888 crown made for William II, Emperor of Germany, in his role as King of Prussia. A Crown of the German Empire was never made. It was only used for heraldic purposes.

Crown of William II The Crown of William II, also known as the Hohenzollern Crown, is the 1888 crown made for William II, Emperor of Germany, in his role as King of Prussia. A Crown of the German Empire was never made. It was only used for heraldic purposes.

Victoria - queen Victoria and Baroness Lehzen with Duchess of Kent, Lady Flora Hastings and Sir John Conroy

Victoria - queen Victoria and Baroness Lehzen with Duchess of Kent, Lady Flora Hastings and Sir John Conroy

Epaulettes first appeared on British uniforms in the second half of the 18th century. The epaulette was officially incorporated into Royal Navy uniform regulations in 1795, although some officers wore them before this date. Under this system Flag Officers wore silver stars on their epaulettes to distinguish their ranks. A Captain with at least three years seniority had two plain epaulettes, while a Junior Captain wore one on the right shoulder, and a Commander one of the left

Epaulettes first appeared on British uniforms in the second half of the 18th century. The epaulette was officially incorporated into Royal Navy uniform regulations in 1795, although some officers wore them before this date. Under this system Flag Officers wore silver stars on their epaulettes to distinguish their ranks. A Captain with at least three years seniority had two plain epaulettes, while a Junior Captain wore one on the right shoulder, and a Commander one of the left

Another I uniform (19th Century)

Another I uniform (19th Century)