David Michel
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"Tears of elation at a liminal moment" What Tears Look Like When You See Them Under a Microscope - PolicyMic  http://www.policymic.com/articles/89429/what-tears-look-like-when-you-see-them-under-a-microscope?utm_source=policymicTBLR&utm_medium=main&utm_campaign=social

tears under the microscope revealed startling differences. Rose-Lynn Fisher /Topography of Tears

Radiolarian of Cyrtopera laguncula

Radiolarian - Cyrtolagena laguncula Although it seems a beautiful glass bottle, it is a radiolarian, a tiny marine protozoan that measures less than one millimeter.

Passion flower pollen, SEM

Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a passion flower (Passiflora caerulea) pollen grain. Pollen grains are the male gametes (sex cells) of a plant. Magnification: when printed 10 centimetres wide.

Diatoms are microscopic algae composed of separate halves, with delicate siliceous cell walls. They're usually single-celled organisms, though some live colonially. They inhabit fresh and salt waters and are among the most abundant of all phytoplankton.

Diatoms are microscopic algae composed of separate halves, with delicate siliceous cell walls. They're usually single-celled organisms, though some live colonially. They inhabit fresh and salt waters and are among the most abundant of all phytoplankton.

Puffy Stars Star-Shaped Sand Grains from Okinawa. These tiny foram, a type of protozoa, secrete beautiful star-shaped, calcium carbonate shells, or tests.

Puffy Stars ~ Star-Shaped Sand Grains from Okinawa. These tiny foram, a type of protozoa, secrete beautiful star-shaped, calcium carbonate shells, or tests.

Oceanographer Paul Hargreaves and artist Faye Darling used an electron microscope to capture this image of a diatom – a tiny single-celled marine algae – that looks exactly like lips.

"This may look like Salvador Dali's Mae West Lips Sofa, but it is a colourised scanning electron microscope image of a diatom - a tiny single-celled marine creature invisible to the naked eye. Image by Dr Paul Hargreaves and Faye Darling