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These incredible images of snowflakes and ice crystals were captured using a Scanning Electron Microscope at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Maryland.

This amazing close up shows one tiny snowflake as a hexagonal shape with some crystalline structures forming along its rim. (Photo courtesy of emu.gov) via Yahoo

These incredible images of snowflakes and ice crystals were captured using a Scanning Electron Microscope at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Maryland.

Microscopic Snowflake Images of snowflakes and ice crystals were captured using a Scanning Electron Microscope at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Maryland.

These incredible images of snowflakes and ice crystals were captured using a Scanning Electron Microscope at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Maryland.

From the Department of Awesome Natural Wonders come these amazing images of snowflakes magnified under an electron microscope at the Electron Microscopy Unit of the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland.

These incredible images of snowflakes and ice crystals were captured using a Scanning Electron Microscope at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Maryland.

Under the super-cooled electron microscope, amazing detail about ice crystals is revealed. For example, this facet snow crystal has a concave dip towards the front of it. (Photo courtesy of emu.

These incredible images of snowflakes and ice crystals were captured using a Scanning Electron Microscope at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Maryland.

Frozen snowflakes - Scientists have figured out how to capture them and photograph with an electron microscope. Shipping: Once captured on the copper plate, they can be shipped in a previously liquid nitrogen-cooled container.

These incredible images of snowflakes and ice crystals were captured using a Scanning Electron Microscope at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Maryland.

Photographed using a specialized microscope whose viewing stage is chilled to scientists in Maryland are showing a whole new side to what's caught on the tip of our tongues. Using a low-temperature scanning electron microscope, researchers.