Robin Blaser's "Suddenly," from his 2008 Griffin Poetry Prize winning collection The Holy Forest, fascinates in myriad ways and on many levels. Deceptively simple and arresting is who he wields word and line spacing to guide the reader and create haunting, subliminal effects.

Robin Blaser's "Suddenly," from his 2008 Griffin Poetry Prize winning collection The Holy Forest, fascinates in myriad ways and on many levels. Deceptively simple and arresting is who he wields word and line spacing to guide the reader and create haunting, subliminal effects.

What is the message underlying the cryptic but alluring whimsy of John Ashbery's poem "Token Resistance", from his 2008 Griffin Poetry Prize winning collection Notes from the Air? Perhaps different readers receive different messages, but there is definitely something there for all of us to unearth.

Explore the best John Ashbery quotes here at OpenQuotes. Quotations, aphorisms and citations by John Ashbery

Not only is this fragment of Christopher Logue's work Homer: War Music entrancing poetry, it hints strongly of other art forms at which Logue excelled.

Not only is this fragment of Christopher Logue's work Homer: War Music entrancing poetry, it hints strongly of other art forms at which Logue excelled.

On this searing date, let's look again at how Fanny Howe and Kamau Brathwaite uniquely chose to recognize it.

On this searing date, let's look again at how Fanny Howe and Kamau Brathwaite uniquely chose to recognize it.

We marvel at how Soraya Peerbaye can pack so much power into such a spare, soft-spoken poem such as "Clean", from her 2016 Griffin Poetry Prize shortlisted collection Tell: poems for a girlhood.

We marvel at how Soraya Peerbaye can pack so much power into such a spare, soft-spoken poem such as "Clean", from her 2016 Griffin Poetry Prize shortlisted collection Tell: poems for a girlhood.

One of the most affecting parts of Jane Munro's 2015 Griffin Poetry Prize winning collection "Blue Sonoma" is the section entitled "Old Man Vacanas". We previously examined the first of that spare, touching 11-part sequence. This time, let's take a closer look - and a listen, courtesy of the poet herself - of the fifth part of the sequence.

Does a poem's title affect your reaction to the entire poem? Let's examine Jane Munro's "Valley of the Moon" from her 2015 Griffin Poetry Prize winning collection "Blue Sonoma" with this in mind.

This section of Anne Michael's book-length poem Correspondences - a unique collaboration with artist Bernice Eisenstein melded with imaginative physical book design - echoes the book's singular construction, which allows and invites you to read it quite literally in different directions. Let's revisit and consider it again.

This section of Anne Michael's book-length poem Correspondences - a unique collaboration with artist Bernice Eisenstein melded with imaginative physical book design - echoes the book's singular construction, which allows and invites you to read it quite literally in different directions. Let's revisit and consider it again.

With previous Poem of the Week selections, we've looked at how storytelling draw us into poems on the merits of compelling narratives, but manage to achieve even more when combined with poetic effects and artistry. Soraya Peerbaye has done that affectingly and persuasively in "Skin", a three-part prose poem from her 2016 Griffin Poetry Prize shortlisted collection Tell: poems for a girlhood.

We marvel at how Soraya Peerbaye can pack so much power into such a spare, soft-spoken poem such as "Clean", from her 2016 Griffin Poetry Prize shortlisted collection Tell: poems for a girlhood.

While Sue Goyette's delightfully surreal Ocean challenges us, so does it also comfort us, as we've observed. We've been reminded again what a great source of solace poetry can be, so let's consider another selection from Ocean with that in mind.

While Sue Goyette's delightfully surreal Ocean challenges us, so does it also comfort us, as we've observed. We've been reminded again what a great source of solace poetry can be, so let's consider another selection from Ocean with that in mind.

We last pondered one of the gem-like fragments from The Book of Snow here. We're long overdue to look again at Philip Mosley's exquisite translation into English of François Jacqmin's original poetry in French.

The landscape is fixed. It is that powdery yoke / which bogs down in its whiteness." - Francois Jacqmin, untitled poem - 2011 International Griffin Poetry Prize Shortlist (translated by Philip Mosley)

When we last considered a poem from Liz Howard's 2016 Griffin Poetry Prize winning debut poetry collection Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent (Boreal Swing), we noted a feature that she wielded to powerful visual effect. Howard employs that same feature, but this time to notable aural effect, in "Thinktent".

"I have as much at stake / in speaking this / as the water // which also / discloses futurity / in a little black dress" Liz Howard, 2016 Canadian Griffin Poetry Prize shortlist

When humour enters the conversation in a poem, it can produce some fascinating effects, as we've examined in several past Poems of the Week. Of course, the wit that emerges - overtly or covertly and between the lines - and its influence on a poem's impact is heavily predicated on that humour appealing to the reader. How does that work in the sly "Homage to Pessoa", from Frederick Seidel's 2007 Griffin Poetry Prize shortlisted collection Ooga-Booga?

When humour enters the conversation in a poem, it can produce some fascinating effects, as we've examined in several past Poems of the Week. Of course, the wit that emerges - overtly or covertly and between the lines - and its influence on a poem's impact is heavily predicated on that humour appealing to the reader. How does that work in the sly "Homage to Pessoa", from Frederick Seidel's 2007 Griffin Poetry Prize shortlisted collection Ooga-Booga?

The whole world is thinking a lot about Americans right now, isn't it? Although the Poem of the Week choices are scheduled well in advance of their online publication dates, the timing of this excerpt from David Kirby's poem "Americans in Italy", from his collection The Ha-Ha, is uncannily appropriate.

The whole world is thinking a lot about Americans right now, isn't it? Although the Poem of the Week choices are scheduled well in advance of their online publication dates, the timing of this excerpt from David Kirby's poem "Americans in Italy", from his collection The Ha-Ha, is uncannily appropriate.

Considering the mundane subject matter and tone which this poem commences, it becomes revelatory at the end of its crisp 19 lines. How does it manage to startle and refresh us? Let's take a look at "K was supposed to come with the key, I was", which is the first line of a poem originally composed in Danish by Ulrikka S. Gernes, translated into English by Canadian poet/translators Per Brask and Patrick Friesen in a unique collaboration.

Considering the mundane subject matter and tone which this poem commences, it becomes revelatory at the end of its crisp 19 lines. How does it manage to startle and refresh us? Let's take a look at "K was supposed to come with the key, I was", which is the first line of a poem originally composed in Danish by Ulrikka S. Gernes, translated into English by Canadian poet/translators Per Brask and Patrick Friesen in a unique collaboration.

Derek Mahon has a formidable gift for taking as his starting point cues from other art forms, and then taking readers of his poetry on wonderful explorations, both of the inspiring work and of the new paths he forges from them. Let's see where he takes us in the poem "The Lady from the Sea" (after Ibsen, as Mahon notes) from his 2009 Griffin Poetry Prize shortlisted collection Life on Earth.

While carefully and beautifully assembled, Derek Mahon's poem "Insomnia" - from his 2009 Griffin Poetry Prize shortlisted collection Life on Earth - is almost painful to read because it so precisely captures aspects of that affliction.

The narrator of Jennifer Maiden's "My heart has an Embassy" is seeking psychic and possibly physical refuge or escape, from troubles characterized as everything from "earthquakes and aftershocks" to "giant granites of despair." The echoes of news ripped from the headlines that resonated when this poem was originally published still sound, it seems, as we revisit it at the end of 2016.

The narrator of Jennifer Maiden's "My heart has an Embassy" is seeking psychic and possibly physical refuge or escape, from troubles characterized as everything from "earthquakes and aftershocks" to "giant granites of despair." The echoes of news ripped from the headlines that resonated when this poem was originally published still sound, it seems, as we revisit it at the end of 2016.

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