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Wenceslaus Hollar 1607-1677. Portrait of a woman, head and shoulders in profile…

Wenceslaus Hollar 1607-1677. Portrait of a woman, head and shoulders in profile…

Coif 2 Manchester Museum

Text Box: Linen coif with edging and insertion lace. One of many different basic coif shapes. © Museum of Manchester, Platt Hall.

Women's Fashions of the 17th Century: Drawing by Wenceslaus Hollar, circa 1645

"Lady with wide brimmed hat and dark muff." Drawings by Wenceslaus Hollar, circa 1640 English Women's Dress of the Century - Wenceslas Hollar Engravings

Linen coif with needlepoint lace insertions and edges. Composed of one length with narrow openwork hem at edges, folded in half and seamed from front edge half way to back at top with 0.5cm wide insertion of needlepoint lace, back is half-open; seven insertions of needlepoint lace parallel with front edge, evenly spaced round coif c.1640 Manchester City gallery

Text Box: Linen coif with edging and insertion lace. One of many different basic coif shapes. © Museum of Manchester, Platt Hall.

One piece pattern - 6 Steps to Fabulous! Once again, I am breaking my vow to keep HSF posts off of my blog. However, this project has actually been on my plate for quite some time and by some miracle, it’s compl…

Woman's cap (coif) and forehead cloth of undyed linen embroidered with silver and gilt-silver yarns and spangles in daffodil scroll pattern. Same pattern as [Coif (a), forehead cloth (b)]

Coif: ca. 1600-1625, linen, embroidered with linen thread and edged with bobbin lace. "Like a man's nightcap, a woman's coif was informal headwear. It would have been worn by itself indoors, or underneath a hat in public. In Western Europe it was customary for both men and women to cover their heads outdoors until the 1960s. A hat was an essential part of respectable dress and, from a health perspective, head coverings were considered necessary to protect against chills and disease."

Coif: ca. 1600-1625, linen, embroidered with linen thread and edged with bobbin lace. "Like a man's nightcap, a woman's coif was informal headwear. It would have been worn by itself indoors, or underneath a hat in public. In Western Europe it was customary for both men and women to cover their heads outdoors until the 1960s. A hat was an essential part of respectable dress and, from a health perspective, head coverings were considered necessary to protect against chills and disease."

Coif (displayed sideways), 1590-1610; NMS A.1976.704

Woman's cap of white linen with gilt thread and metal sequins: English, c.