Currency and the Collapse of the Roman Empire. The Money Project is an ongoing collaboration between Visual Capitalist and Texas Precious Metals that seeks to use intuitive visualizations to explore the origins, nature, and use of money. At its peak, the Roman Empire held up to 130 million people over a span of 1.5 million square miles. Rome had conquered much of the known world. The Empire built 50,000 miles of roads, as well as many aqueducts, amphitheatres, and other works that are still…

Exclusive FREE liquorice pompom tutorial

How currency debasement, soaring costs, and overtaxing helped lead to the collapse of Ancient Rome's economy and empire.

SPQR Roman Legion tattoo, with "Legio IX Britannia" below it. Yes, I do realize the actual historical name of the Roman Legion that fought in Britiain was "Legio IX Hispana". However, I wanted to be creative about it and as a sign of respect, to both sides who fought and died in Britain during that time period, to rename it to what the Romans called the island, "Britannia".

SPQR Roman Legion tattoo, with "Legio IX Britannia" below it. Yes, I do realize…

The Roman Empire was rather stable until 235 AD and most Emperors remained in power for quite some time. But as the empire destabilized in the period from 235 to 306 AD time in power dropped dramatically.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=152409028470171

Heavy troopers wore thick breastplates for bullet protection, while much of their other armor was simple cloth. This provided necessary protection and dexterity.

The impluvium / compluvium system is a feature of a Roman atrium house. The impluvium is a hole in the ceiling that allows rain water to flow into the compluvium, a basin in the floor made of porous rock. Water was filtered through the compluvium and into a cistern underneath.

From a Spanish forum where they were discussing Roman houses; this is how an impluvium with a cistern below it worked.

VILLA AT BOSCOREALE near Pompeii, Room G, the triclinium, as appearing in the daytime

View of Room G in the Villa Boscoreale, Pompeii during the daytime by James Stanton-Abbott

Pinterest
Search